Kitchen Circulation: Reflections of a Foodservice Designer

When I was in 6th grade I was assigned the greatest project ever – to design and draw my dream home! What could be better? As I start to think about this dream home of mine, I know that it’ll be nothing like my parent’s house. . . it’s so tiny and doesn’t even have a pool! My house is gonna be HUGE! And it’ll have a movie theatre, a mini golf course, a roller rink, a trampoline room and of course, a swimming pool.

I sit down and start to draw my dream home, and it looks a little something like this. . .(only not nearly as nice because I was using colored pencils and a giant piece of poster board).

Dream House

Well, then I grew up, became a foodservice designer and realized that I would never live in said dream house. Looking back, I have to laugh at my design skills at the age of 12, because I included absolutely zero corridors or hallways! Just a room connected to a room connected to a room connected to the POOL!

It’s funny because today when I start to lay out a kitchen, I begin by thinking about traffic patterns and corridors. In the world of hospital foodservice design, there are four main traffic patterns.

  1. Deliveries entering the kitchen
  2. Tray carts to patient floors
  3. Soiled tray carts to the dishroom, and
  4. Staff/visitors to the retail serving area

These traffic patterns have a major impact on the overall foodservice layout, as well as the inter-department corridors.

If you think about all of the activity that’s happening in a kitchen, it’s a lot. People are not only working within their assigned work zones, but they are traveling to storage areas or walk-in boxes to gather ingredients/supplies and collecting soiled pans/utensils and dropping them in the dishroom. They need a way to travel about the department without disrupting the work of others. They need circulation . . . they need corridors!

That said, we do aim to utilize space in an efficient manner by dedicating as much as we can to the actual functions of the kitchen. Even still, we typically figure a 30% circulation factor on our kitchen designs. That means that just about 1/3 of your kitchen will be dedicated to circulation. The reason being is that we want to make sure that we create a distinction between “traffic aisles” and “work aisles”.

A traffic aisle is utilized for just that – traffic. It should not be an area where people are working. From a safety perspective, it’s dangerous to work in a traffic aisle, which is why we also include work aisles. Work aisles are used for working – slicing, dicing, assembling, cooking, baking, brewing, etc., not for pushing or parking carts.

Bottom line here is that, when designing a kitchen, it’s important to consider the corridors – the circulation required for employees to move around to complete their work. In addition, it must include both traffic aisles and work aisles to promote employee safety and efficiency. Unlike my dream home, a kitchen cannot be laid out as a room connected to a room connected to a room.

~Rochelle

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Christine Guyott is honored with FER’s 2017 Industry Service Award

In February, Christine Guyott was honored with Foodservice Equipment Reports’ Industry Service Award. On the eve of the ceremony, she spoke about her career and why healthcare will always be her professional passion. Enjoy this FCSI Interview with Michael Jones.

FCSI Interview w CG-TakingCare_2017-2-cropped Read interview

“It takes a long time to learn how to be a consultant. And it’s hard to be the expert in the room until you have the experience behind you.”

Navigating Design-Build and P3 Projects

Terry Pellegrino presents at 2017 NACUFS Midwest Regional

 

Many campus projects have varying timelines, requirements and methods to get to the end result. We as Foodservice Operators only have one common goal – to end up with spaces that work in locations where students will come with enough support space to run our operation efficiently. The University of Iowa and the University of Kansas were asked to create two very different documents that went out with their RFPs. Both of these documents had great ideas and both of them caused challenges.

This presentation included case studies from projects on these two campuses. Terry and her colleagues shared lessons learned and best practices to enable operators in helping their department create successful projects. We received positive feedback from those who attended the session in that it gave them a better understanding of reporting relationships involved in a construction project and how to make sure you as operators can be involved.NACUFS MW-2017 Design-BuildNACUFS MW-2017 P3 slide

If your campus is planning a renovation or building project whether it be a Public-Private Partnership or a Design-Build, it helps to understand construction terms and phases. Knowing the players and timelines of Design-Bid-Build, Design-Build, Construction Management at Risk, etc.

If you would like further information, have any questions or needs we can help you with, please give us a call 952-933-0313.

 

*Navigating Design-Build and P3 Projects co-presenters were two clients – Jill Irvin, Director of University Dining at the University of Iowa and Alecia Stultz, Assistant Director of Retail Dining at KU Dining Services.

Anatomy of a Renovation

Follow this five-part series about how the University of Chicago Medical Center juggled its priorities to overhaul a kitchen and the challenges of renovation versus new construction. The series, published in Foodservice Director Magazine, takes you from blueprints to reality, and it starts here with Part 1.

ucmc-ctr-for-care-and-discovery

FCSI-The Americas 2016 Project Showcase Features Two Rippe Projects

 

It is always an honor to be included in the annual FCSI Showcase publication. This year’s edition features two Rippe projects– Surly Brewing Co. in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Palos Community Hospital in Palos Heights, Illinois. These projects were selected not only for their excellence in commercial foodservice design and operational functionality, but also for their clever solutions to a range of challenges on the road to meeting their client’s goals. Read more about these two projects and see some great photos.

150323_006_tiny pizzaoven-3_palos_pch91815-1378-tiny                                                  Surly Brewing Co.                     Palos Community Hospital

Dining Experience Transformation at UND Wilkerson Commons

FE&S Feature Project September 2016

UND Grand Forks – Wilkerson Commons transformed the dining experience with a culinary support center and contemporary food-themed platforms.

wilkerson-dining-center-garden-greens_smWilkerson Hall was the largest dining center serving five surrounding residence halls housing 1,300 students, but it had the lowest participation. One of the challenges facing the design team was to enhance the perception of food at Wilkerson Hall which was previously seen as not equal to other venues on campus. The foodservice design needed to be impactful enough to change the students’ minds. This was accomplished with display cooking at each station and by giving each individual food station its own identify based on the menu items being served.

Another challenge was that, given the significant investment, the university wanted to maximize flexibility of spaces to provide a variety of functions beyond dining. One of the ways this was accomplished was by designing parts of the building, such as the kitchen and serving area, to be shut down at certain times while other areas, such as seating, could remain open. The stone hearth pizza concept in the main serving area was designed to support this flexible use by incorporating an after-hours serving window that faces the dining room. Read more here…

Christine Guyott to lead AHF’s Advisory Board

Eric Schramm Photography 2015Christine Guyott, principal at Rippe Associates, has begun her second year in a two-year term with the Association of Healthcare Foodservice (AHF).  Last year she served as the Industry Advisory Board’s (IAB) vice chair and this year she serves as chair.  She was asked to lead the board by incoming president, Julie Jones from Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center. The new term started last month and continues through next year’s annual conference in Washington D.C. The board has already been working on a new marketing program, a technology platform, and membership engagement to meet strategic initiatives. Says Christine, “I love giving back to an organization of my peers and friends, and am excited to be involved with this professional group.”  Congrats Christine!