Our Time Gaining Perspective and Cultivating Relationships

Some foodservice design consultants walk into a custom fabrication shop . . .

. . . no, this is not the beginning of a really great joke, nope, just another day at the office for some members of Team Rippe.

Thanks to Brandon Hansen and his crew at Albers Commercial Kitchen Services, we were welcomed into – or invaded (however you want to look at it) – their shop last week. Members of our team had the opportunity to see custom fabricated pieces, in progress, from projects they had drawn. They also discussed various construction methods, asked questions about our standard details, and gained a better understanding of the fabricator’s job and perspective.

Zach wanted to go to Albers in an effort to “better understand the inner workings of a counter. It’s one thing to see something in 2D on a computer, but it always helps to see it in person.”

Rippe Touring Albers

Mark and Brandon discussing construction while others look at the in-progress cabinets.

You see, occasionally, we must admit that what we thought would work in our heads and on paper, doesn’t necessarily translate into real-life the way we envisioned. Having a positive relationship with Albers, helps us to do our job better. When we do our job better, Brandon, Jason, Tom and the team at Albers are better able to do quotes, produce accurate shop drawings, and build the final piece from our construction documents because they are clear and reliable.

While at the shop, the group was able to take a few measurements and photos of the framework for the counters he draws in Revit. “It was also helpful to understand the restraints and capabilities of their equipment because it will help to think ‘can this be done’ during design.”

Rippe Touring Albers

Serving counter in progress.

Our project managers also value having a good relationship with the fabricators we recommend and work with during the construction administration phase of a project. Getting a phone call with a problem AND potential solution is always preferred. “I’d much rather have a fabricator call and say, ‘Your drawings say you want this, but that doesn’t work because of this site condition. If I do this other thing instead, you will end up with a very similar result. Is that acceptable?’ It doesn’t serve anyone well when they don’t call at all and I see something that is unusable or detrimental to the efficiencies of an end user when I show up at the punchlist.” says Jill

During the visit, Ashley wanted to see the fabrication process and while there was unexpectedly able to “learn more about muffin fans than I ever thought I needed to know.” Which, some people may just get a confused look on their face, while others will be elated that foodservice design consultants even CONSIDER muffin fans!

Rippe Touring Albers

Check out these muffin fans!

And while we like to stay on-task and all business, we did learn that the team at Albers does have a sense of humor!  You see when the inspector came through and said they had to label ALL of their buildings (some of which seen in the picture below) they decided to name one of their buildings the White House!

Rippe Touring Albers

Millwork, Stainless Cabinets . . . where’s the White House?!

Thanks again to the Albers crew – I’m sure we’ll bother you again soon!

~Team Rippe

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Passionate + Dedicated = Top Achiever Award

We at Rippe Associates are proud to see Christine’s contributions to our firm and the industry acknowledged by our peers. I regularly see her passion come through in her commitment to quality for her projects, the consulting profession, and healthcare foodservice departments.

Christine and Steve 2018

From her first week on this career path (where she went to a meeting for a regional hospital and they wouldn’t let her leave until there was a schematic design) she proves regularly that she doesn’t shy away from any challenge. Whether it is being allotted enough space by an architect, allocating enough money for the appropriate equipment in the budget by an owner or providing designs that reflect current trends for an outdated department, Christine is a courageous advocate for her clients and passionate about making sure foodservice operators get what they need to meet administration and customer expectations.

Christine is also passionate about continuous improvement. Through her work with various associations that provide resources for operators, consultants, and other industry members, she is always working to push the foodservice industry to the next level. I don’t want to say how long Christine has been at this, but there was a fax machine involved in the beginning, and if I’ve learned anything from her in that time, it’s that her next project is going to build on top of her last, not be the same thing all over again.

Congratulations Christine! It’s a well-deserved acknowledgment of all you have done and continue to do for the foodservice world! ~ Steve

Remarkable – Starting 20 Years Ago

Twenty years. For some reason that seems like a long time and a short time all at once. Maybe it’s because I’m more “seasoned” now than I was twenty years ago. However, when we sat down to celebrate Amy Fick’s 20th anniversary with the company it really got me thinking about what twenty years means.

In 1997, many things happened (most of which I remember) China resumed control of Hong Kong from England, OJ Simpson lost the civil suit for wrongful death, Princess Diana and Mother Theresa died. Titanic was the biggest box-office film ever, Harry Potter was published, and we all sang “mmmbop” with Hanson. The Marlins won the World Series, the Arizona Wildcats won the NCAA Basketball Championship, the Chicago Bulls won the NBA Championship and the Packers won the Super Bowl. The US was introduced to Pokemon and Amy Fick was introduced to Robert Rippe and Associates.

As an office of just 15 people, there wasn’t much of an orientation or training program, but none the less Amy figured out what we did and how to do it. Over the years she’s seen changes in people, technology, and expectations. What hasn’t changed is her desire to do the best work possible and her love of drawing.  There are not many people who take a job and think they’ll be there 20 years later, yet we have eight people who have been with us for twenty years or longer. I think that says something, not only about our company but this industry. When you find your way to a home, like foodservice consulting, you either embrace it and find that this is your passion, or you get out quickly. Lucky for us, and many of our clients, Amy embraced this industry and strives to provide the best solution possible each day.

Happy anniversary Amy!

Amy_Fick_20_Anniversary

Kitchen Circulation: Reflections of a Foodservice Designer

When I was in 6th grade I was assigned the greatest project ever – to design and draw my dream home! What could be better? As I start to think about this dream home of mine, I know that it’ll be nothing like my parent’s house. . . it’s so tiny and doesn’t even have a pool! My house is gonna be HUGE! And it’ll have a movie theatre, a mini golf course, a roller rink, a trampoline room and of course, a swimming pool.

I sit down and start to draw my dream home, and it looks a little something like this. . .(only not nearly as nice because I was using colored pencils and a giant piece of poster board).

Dream House

Well, then I grew up, became a foodservice designer and realized that I would never live in said dream house. Looking back, I have to laugh at my design skills at the age of 12, because I included absolutely zero corridors or hallways! Just a room connected to a room connected to a room connected to the POOL!

It’s funny because today when I start to lay out a kitchen, I begin by thinking about traffic patterns and corridors. In the world of hospital foodservice design, there are four main traffic patterns.

  1. Deliveries entering the kitchen
  2. Tray carts to patient floors
  3. Soiled tray carts to the dishroom, and
  4. Staff/visitors to the retail serving area

These traffic patterns have a major impact on the overall foodservice layout, as well as the inter-department corridors.

If you think about all of the activity that’s happening in a kitchen, it’s a lot. People are not only working within their assigned work zones, but they are traveling to storage areas or walk-in boxes to gather ingredients/supplies and collecting soiled pans/utensils and dropping them in the dishroom. They need a way to travel about the department without disrupting the work of others. They need circulation . . . they need corridors!

That said, we do aim to utilize space in an efficient manner by dedicating as much as we can to the actual functions of the kitchen. Even still, we typically figure a 30% circulation factor on our kitchen designs. That means that just about 1/3 of your kitchen will be dedicated to circulation. The reason being is that we want to make sure that we create a distinction between “traffic aisles” and “work aisles”.

A traffic aisle is utilized for just that – traffic. It should not be an area where people are working. From a safety perspective, it’s dangerous to work in a traffic aisle, which is why we also include work aisles. Work aisles are used for working – slicing, dicing, assembling, cooking, baking, brewing, etc., not for pushing or parking carts.

Bottom line here is that, when designing a kitchen, it’s important to consider the corridors – the circulation required for employees to move around to complete their work. In addition, it must include both traffic aisles and work aisles to promote employee safety and efficiency. Unlike my dream home, a kitchen cannot be laid out as a room connected to a room connected to a room.

~Rochelle

Christine Guyott is honored with FER’s 2017 Industry Service Award

In February, Christine Guyott was honored with Foodservice Equipment Reports’ Industry Service Award. On the eve of the ceremony, she spoke about her career and why healthcare will always be her professional passion. Enjoy this FCSI Interview with Michael Jones.

FCSI Interview w CG-TakingCare_2017-2-cropped Read interview

“It takes a long time to learn how to be a consultant. And it’s hard to be the expert in the room until you have the experience behind you.”

Anatomy of a Renovation

Follow this five-part series about how the University of Chicago Medical Center juggled its priorities to overhaul a kitchen and the challenges of renovation versus new construction. The series, published in Foodservice Director Magazine, takes you from blueprints to reality, and it starts here with Part 1.

ucmc-ctr-for-care-and-discovery

FCSI-The Americas 2016 Project Showcase Features Two Rippe Projects

 

It is always an honor to be included in the annual FCSI Showcase publication. This year’s edition features two Rippe projects– Surly Brewing Co. in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Palos Community Hospital in Palos Heights, Illinois. These projects were selected not only for their excellence in commercial foodservice design and operational functionality, but also for their clever solutions to a range of challenges on the road to meeting their client’s goals. Read more about these two projects and see some great photos.

150323_006_tiny pizzaoven-3_palos_pch91815-1378-tiny                                                  Surly Brewing Co.                     Palos Community Hospital