Meet The Newest Rippe Team Members

We are so excited that Zach Swanson and Amanda Ahlschwede have joined our team!

Prior to joining Rippe, Zach was a Facility Designer at Maintenance Design Group (MDG), a transportation and operations consultant group. When asked what he likes about the world of foodservice, Zach stated, “Foodservice is an industry in motion. Also, my wife, Toni, is a dietitian and it’s so much fun to share and learn from one another.” Zach is a Project Coordinator and currently learning the ins and outs of the hospitality and gaming segment.

Amanda comes to us from Ball State University where she was a Dining Supervisor. While moving to Minnesota means she is closer to family and gets to participate in all those fun activities, she’s also excited to stay in the foodservice world to keep up on the trends and see how they change. Amanda is an Equipment Specialist and learning how to navigate the world of equipment manufacturer’s to get answers for end users.

While they both agree that the best comfort food is tator tot hot dish – can you tell they love the mid-west? – if you end up at a happy hour with these two, you are going to need to make sure they serve both beer and hard alcohol as Zach likes trying new beers and Amanda will stick with her Jack & Coke.

Welcome to the team Zach & Amanda, we are excited you are here!Newest Team Members

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Our Office Operations Team!

For those of you who have visited our office, these may be some familiar faces. If you haven’t been able to make it in, we’d like to show off the people that really run the operation around here! Without these three the rest of us would NOT be able to function! Please say hello to our office operations team . . .

Welcome to the website (1)

Joely is our Administrative Assistant and has the very hard job of making sure we have some sense of sanity around here. She also likes to ask a “Question of the Day” to anyone that will answer!

Gretchen is our Accounting Manager and attempts to keep us all on budget! Whew, that’s a tough one! I’m not sure if she’d say that we are harder to deal with, or her three teenagers 😉

And last, but certainly not least we have our Business Manager Jan. She has many things on her plate, one of which is that she is in charge of making sure our technology is operating and that we aren’t screwing it up. If she’s ever able to find some free time when that is taken care of she can either be found taking pictures, painting or at an auction looking for a deal!

In all honesty, these three have been doing thankless jobs for many years and I wanted to make sure everyone knows who really runs the operations around here! Thank you, Joely, Gretchen, and Jan for all you do for all of us at Rippe Associates!

Kitchen Circulation: Reflections of a Foodservice Designer

When I was in 6th grade I was assigned the greatest project ever – to design and draw my dream home! What could be better? As I start to think about this dream home of mine, I know that it’ll be nothing like my parent’s house. . . it’s so tiny and doesn’t even have a pool! My house is gonna be HUGE! And it’ll have a movie theatre, a mini golf course, a roller rink, a trampoline room and of course, a swimming pool.

I sit down and start to draw my dream home, and it looks a little something like this. . .(only not nearly as nice because I was using colored pencils and a giant piece of poster board).

Dream House

Well, then I grew up, became a foodservice designer and realized that I would never live in said dream house. Looking back, I have to laugh at my design skills at the age of 12, because I included absolutely zero corridors or hallways! Just a room connected to a room connected to a room connected to the POOL!

It’s funny because today when I start to lay out a kitchen, I begin by thinking about traffic patterns and corridors. In the world of hospital foodservice design, there are four main traffic patterns.

  1. Deliveries entering the kitchen
  2. Tray carts to patient floors
  3. Soiled tray carts to the dishroom, and
  4. Staff/visitors to the retail serving area

These traffic patterns have a major impact on the overall foodservice layout, as well as the inter-department corridors.

If you think about all of the activity that’s happening in a kitchen, it’s a lot. People are not only working within their assigned work zones, but they are traveling to storage areas or walk-in boxes to gather ingredients/supplies and collecting soiled pans/utensils and dropping them in the dishroom. They need a way to travel about the department without disrupting the work of others. They need circulation . . . they need corridors!

That said, we do aim to utilize space in an efficient manner by dedicating as much as we can to the actual functions of the kitchen. Even still, we typically figure a 30% circulation factor on our kitchen designs. That means that just about 1/3 of your kitchen will be dedicated to circulation. The reason being is that we want to make sure that we create a distinction between “traffic aisles” and “work aisles”.

A traffic aisle is utilized for just that – traffic. It should not be an area where people are working. From a safety perspective, it’s dangerous to work in a traffic aisle, which is why we also include work aisles. Work aisles are used for working – slicing, dicing, assembling, cooking, baking, brewing, etc., not for pushing or parking carts.

Bottom line here is that, when designing a kitchen, it’s important to consider the corridors – the circulation required for employees to move around to complete their work. In addition, it must include both traffic aisles and work aisles to promote employee safety and efficiency. Unlike my dream home, a kitchen cannot be laid out as a room connected to a room connected to a room.

~Rochelle

Confessions Of A Former Operator After An Amazing Conference

Dinner

Attending the National Association of College & University Food Services (NACUFS) Conferences are one of the highlights of my year. The passion that the individuals have for their school and their program is always energetic and this year in Nashville was no exception. Occasionally I even miss being in operations when I’m at these conferences hearing about the amazing accomplishments of individuals, such as the newest Minah Award Winner Rich Neumann, or all of the incredible programs on various campuses. The education committee for each conference takes their job very seriously and I always enjoy the various speakers and edu-tainment which they provide. This year, among other professional speakers, 63 individuals from various institutions presented successful programs, information, and ideas on how to make their program better with their peers! Can you even believe it? 63 people just giving away their secrets as to how they were (and weren’t) successful so others can learn and succeed! The amount of information that these individuals share with one another is just amazing!

The items that stood out for me in the sessions I could attend were:

  • The definition of True Collaboration includes the word “PROCESS”
  • For a prospective student, when all other items about a college are equal (program, opportunity, scholarships, etc.), the DINING program can be the deciding factor!
  • I still totally GEEK out at analyzing numbers
  • Reducing food waste is on the mind of many and figuring out WHERE to start can be difficult
  • Being EPIC does not mean you are perfect
  • Including things like TVs, video game consoles and pool tables in a facility with an unlimited all you care to eat meal plan does not mean that there will be an increase in food cost or waste; it does mean is that student engagement INCREASES dramatically!
  • How we think we sound and what the rest of the world hears can be very DIFFERENT

Thank you to all the hardworking committee members of NACUFS for a great conference! In a world of so much negativity, it was a wonderful reminder that there are people who still want to Band Together – Learn together. Work together. Succeed together.

See y’all soon! – Megan 

 

Christine Guyott is honored with FER’s 2017 Industry Service Award

In February, Christine Guyott was honored with Foodservice Equipment Reports’ Industry Service Award. On the eve of the ceremony, she spoke about her career and why healthcare will always be her professional passion. Enjoy this FCSI Interview with Michael Jones.

FCSI Interview w CG-TakingCare_2017-2-cropped Read interview

“It takes a long time to learn how to be a consultant. And it’s hard to be the expert in the room until you have the experience behind you.”

Navigating Design-Build and P3 Projects

Terry Pellegrino presents at 2017 NACUFS Midwest Regional

 

Many campus projects have varying timelines, requirements and methods to get to the end result. We as Foodservice Operators only have one common goal – to end up with spaces that work in locations where students will come with enough support space to run our operation efficiently. The University of Iowa and the University of Kansas were asked to create two very different documents that went out with their RFPs. Both of these documents had great ideas and both of them caused challenges.

This presentation included case studies from projects on these two campuses. Terry and her colleagues shared lessons learned and best practices to enable operators in helping their department create successful projects. We received positive feedback from those who attended the session in that it gave them a better understanding of reporting relationships involved in a construction project and how to make sure you as operators can be involved.NACUFS MW-2017 Design-BuildNACUFS MW-2017 P3 slide

If your campus is planning a renovation or building project whether it be a Public-Private Partnership or a Design-Build, it helps to understand construction terms and phases. Knowing the players and timelines of Design-Bid-Build, Design-Build, Construction Management at Risk, etc.

If you would like further information, have any questions or needs we can help you with, please give us a call 952-933-0313.

 

*Navigating Design-Build and P3 Projects co-presenters were two clients – Jill Irvin, Director of University Dining at the University of Iowa and Alecia Stultz, Assistant Director of Retail Dining at KU Dining Services.

Anatomy of a Renovation

Follow this five-part series about how the University of Chicago Medical Center juggled its priorities to overhaul a kitchen and the challenges of renovation versus new construction. The series, published in Foodservice Director Magazine, takes you from blueprints to reality, and it starts here with Part 1.

ucmc-ctr-for-care-and-discovery